1.30.2017

How Immigration Policies Shape America: A Ketchikan Photo Essay

The recent uproar over the Trump Administration's immigration policies reminded me of a few historically-significant facts that I learned about three businesses while visiting Ketchikan, Alaska, last September (2016). Others might benefit from learning about them, too, so enjoy!

1. I learned about Tatsuda's Grocery and how the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor impacted the family in two ways. Not only was the family sent to internment camps at the order of American government, but three sons served in the US Armed Forces at the same time the family was being interned. 

Crazy? That's America and that's history, folks. 
























2. I also learned about the history of the Diaz Cafe; specifically, that while immigration laws in the 1920s restricted Chinese and Japanese immigrants from coming to America, Filipinos were not blocked from immigrating. Thus, Ketchikan boomed with 'Alaskeros' who became part of the community, and still are.

So, it can be viewed as bad that certain groups were blocked from immigrating, yet at the same time other groups were allowed in who made America their new home -- and that can be viewed as good! Right or wrong, that is how history played out, and it is something to learn from.
















3. Lastly, I learned about the family who started the New York Hotel and Cafe. Even before the internment camps of WWII, in 1925 the Shimizu family was forced to move to another area in town due to local efforts to improve buildings and move minorities out. And this is Alaska, folks...freedom, the last frontier, and all that jazz.

The family was  also interned during World War 2, but people of the community took over running the business and gave the Shimizus all the profits upon their return (release). Now that's community!
























As sad as it is to understand that this is the truth behind a small part of America's history -- people being told they can or cannot live somewhere, people being forced to leave their homes and live in government camps, people being told they are not allowed to move to America -- this is what has made America the America it is today. 

America may not be perfect, like every other country, but it has a history unlike any other; and history continues to be made every day whether people go along with laws, fight laws, or ignore laws. Because it's the people who make America and its history incredible, not the government.

1.15.2017

I Don't Need Feminism...or Do I?

As a post-Women's Lib Gen-Xer, all I have ever been taught and shown by the world around me is that women can do anything and everything a man can do, at least legally speaking.

Here's the thought, though, that feminists forgot, or that got blocked by gatekeepers: Do I want to do everything? Who cares if I can do everything? Do I want to, as a woman of my own free will and volition, do everything and anything a man can do?

Let me think on that for a split second.

No! I absolutely do not want to do anything and everything a man can do. And why would I, or why should I? So that then I can be a man? Then, if I'm so manly that I can do it all myself, why would I want a man around since he can't do anything for me that I can't do myself? And why would a man want to be around me if I'm so manly; so that he can treat me like one of the guys? No, thank you.

Instead, what if, rather than trying to do anything and everything a man can do, I were to focus on becoming anything and everything a woman can be, considering that's what I am? Is that too crazy? I mean, how dare a woman not want to be a man, right? Right.

Not right.

This [ill]logic of feminism does amuse me, so much that I have taken it as a form of inspiration in creating new graphic designs for my online shops (links in sidebar); here are the four newest RedBubble stickers. What do you think?

Okay; so maybe I do need feminism...to inspire me to fight back against it!